Sports Games are a waste of time? It is not owned by sports sponsors


In the classroom at the Roosevelt Field Mall in Long Island, 10 young boys settled on the structure of the structure of the structure. Anyone sitting on the computer computer, the ears are loud in the sound.

Parents and grandparents moved around the room, picking up the top of the shoulders. One mother used the iPhone to live in social media.

The room felt a sporting event and it was – a sports club for the Bay Shore Sports School team competing in the competition with the scholarships & # 39;

The video game played slowly, most of the viewers, called the 'e-sport & # 39; they became a central element of the college education. In the past two years, Collegiate Esports National Coalition, which specializes in the 98-specialty program in the United States and Canada, helped to make $ 16 million of scholarships, according to executive director Michael Brooks.

"Shortly after the games, collegiate players have a deeper reality, they have a very strong strategic level, and they need a functional group and they need to be successful – and not You are not alone in a group environment and using the "Kurt Melcher," run by Robert Morris.

A few years away from the university, Mr. Melcher was the football coach and sporting director at Robert Morris When in 2013, he discovered that the university was coming out. Students organized themselves, creating unique opportunities for sports. So he suggested the management of the university: What if the game was fun?

"If you look at sports, how do you define what is involved in sports? Is football football more than tennis players or tennis tennis, and golf more or less playing than football?" He said.

Sport and leisure activities at the high school and university level live on gamer stereotype: because Mr. Melcher said, "Children have been locked in basement, refusal, offense, drinks 50 Dows Mountains and not a type of valuable person in the community." In educational settings, game play usually brings students to the inner rooms and the bedrooms.

Bay Shore High School, Ryan Champlin, an adult, started the group helping his father, Chris; Another brother, Kyle; and the computer teacher, Mike Masino. The team is part of the school computer network.